Lastest News

Price Increase - May 2017

New Rates: Onsite support (per half hour): £25 + possible call out (£20 max*)
Remote support (per half hour): £15 + annaul subscription (please see here for more info)

These changes will be effective from the May 2017 .

Please note that customers who have a current remote support subscription will NOT be charged the increased rates for remote support sessions. Please refer the renewal email for relevant rates.

* Unless agreed otherwise before the visit.

Price Increase due to Retail Price Index inflation - (30/04/2015)

Unfortunately, the Price of on-site support and remote support we charge will be increased. These changes are due to the increase in the Retail Price Index (RPI) (one index of inflation), in the last five years there has been a 18.4 percent increase in the index, according to the ONS website Link.

We will only be increasing the rates by 10 percent, not the 18.4 percent figure from the RPI. This is the first time we have increased these rates in the last five years. We hope you share our belief that this is a fair and relatively small increase.

On average this will been seen as a £6 increase (based on the £60 average charge for on-site and remote sessions), which is a new total of £66.

These changes will be effective from the 01/05/2015.

Please note that customers who have a current remote support subscription will NOT be charged the increased rates for remote support sessions.

Microsoft Windows 10 - FREE - (22/01/2015)

Microsoft will be making Windows 10 available for people with Windows 7 and 8 plus people who have a Windows phone. The Operating System will be free for users who download it within the first year of it's release.

Phone Scam - (07/12/2014)

Your friendly Cotgrave based IT support company (LSCS) was, yet again, given the opportunity to experience the well documented "Windows Support" phone scam.

Simon was able to keep the conman on the phone for 14 minutes. In that time, they tried to authenticate themselves by getting him to display the file associations for his computer. The last of these is a special key, which is used for the "Send-To" function on Windows, but looks like a product key and is the same on all Windows-based PCs. The aim is that after reading out the same string of text as in front of you, they try to convince the unsuspecting user they are from "Windows" or "Microsoft".

Unfortunately, after getting the conman to read out this key for the fourth time (purely to have some fun), they hung up.

If this happens to you, please just tell them you don't have a PC and then hang up.

Here is an article by welivesecurity, which goes in to it in more detail